4th - 7th May 2016

Liverpool

Stephanie_Locke.jpg

Stephanie Locke

Steph Locke wants to live in a world where everyone she encounters enjoys their jobs and is awesome. Since she's gifted with the inability to be daunted by a task, she's using her unbounded perkiness to bring awesomeness to the people. In the day job of Principal Consultant at Mango Solutions, she roves the countryside helping people use a blend of open source and proprietary technologies to make better decisions, which hopefully means more money for businesses! When she’s not doing the day job, you can probably find her at a community event. If it's not an event she's organised, then she's at someone else's event where they've been crazy enough to let her talk or help out at. EARL, SQLBits, SQL Relay and SQL Saturday organisers have all let Steph speak and help out, and most recently she's been made a Microsoft Data Platform MVP. 
http://steph.itsalocke.com http://itsalocke.com/feed/
Stephanie Locke has submitted 5 sessions for SQLBits XV, although the agenda hasn't been chosen yet. See all submitted sessions.

Pending Sessions

The R is out there! Get to grips with how R will be impacting a Microsoft BI stack near you
Captain’s log: Their data integration speed is astonishing, their reports are correct, they have an uber-ticket clearance rate. This newly discovered race of BI Analysts are doing something called DataOps…
Argh, the maths aliens are coming! Don’t shout EXTERMINATE, they come in peace - learn how you can peacefully coexist with them
There's base R, modern R, the Hadleyverse, R in SQL, and more - understanding where to begin can be an exercise in frustration and cost you valuable time. This session takes you through the R you need to be productive quickly.
Whether it's M, R, Python or C#, the world seems to be be conspiring against me, my SQL, and my GUI. What should I be learning and how do I go about it?

Previous Sessions

R was originally for doing stats, but it now does database CRUD, reporting, documentation, and even websites. It can be awkward to know where to start, so this session fast tracks you to the sections you need to know about.
Need a snazzy dashboarding tool, and want it free or cheap? With a modicum of R and Linux knowledge, you can make interactive realtime dashboards for free that can be used in any web browser. Learn how in this session.
There's base R, modern R, the Hadleyverse, R in SQL, and more - understanding where to begin can be an exercise in frustration and cost you valuable time. This session takes you through the R you need to be productive quickly.

Blog posts RSS

Fixing the Tiny Icons, Big Text issue on my XPS13 13 Jan 2016
The Issue I love my Dell XPS13. It’s fast, sleek and gorgeous. It does however have one little problem: the icon and text size. The text was always too big for the buttons and boxes and the icons were so small you could hardly see them. This made it hard to use my machine without … ...

satRdays: final push 06 Jan 2016
I talked back in November about the idea of an RSaturday, which were free community-driven conferences on R. Since then, we created a GitHub repository and started hammering out the details for satRdays. The current proposal consists of: A name: satRday A proposition: Free/cheap (<£30) ...

optiRum 0.37.3 now out 04 Jan 2016
Just a quick heads up to announce the availability of optiRum 0.37.3 – this takes into account the new version of ggplot2 and is backwards compatible. The post optiRum 0.37.3 now out appeared first on It's a Locke.

Anchor Modelling: Sixth Normal Form databases 31 Dec 2015
A bit belated, but on December 5th in Southampton I finally got to present on a database topic this year 😀 I presented on Anchor Modelling, a fantastic methodology and suite of open source tools for building a highly flexible, evolving database. You can check out the slides on Sway. About Anchor ...

Auto-deploying documentation: Rtraining 23 Dec 2015
In my last post on using GitHub, Travis-CI, and rmarkdown/knitr for automatically building and deploying documentation, I covered how I was able to do it with a containerised approach so things were faster. I also said my Rtraining repository was still too brittle to blog about. This has changed ...