4th - 7th May 2016

Liverpool

steve_jones.jpg

Steve Jones

Steve Jones is currently the editor of SQLServerCentral, employed by Red Gate Software. Steve has been working with SQL Server for two decades at a variety of large and small companies. Steve has spent time as a hiring manager as well as a technical DBA, easily moving back and forth between these positions at different employers. He has managed Windows networks, functioned as a production DBA, development DBA, software developer, and DBA manager. His work has included start-up as well as Fortune 1000 companies in the power, financial, education, and software industries. He currently has his dream job managing the largest SQL Server community on the Internet from his ranch in Colorado and writes a daily editorial at SQLServerCentral.
http://www.sqlservercentral.com http://voiceofthedba.wordpress.com/feed/

Sooner or later some sort of disaster occur on your SQL Server instance. It might be the destruction of a server, the corruption of a page inside the database, or just the unexpected deletion of some data. When disaster does strike, will you be prepa
A look at binary data in SQL Server and full-text searching of the content of binary files.
Everyone wants a job they enjoy and look forward to working at each day. This session will present practical techniques for improving your brand and giving you the chance to interview for the job you want.
Building software is hard, and we often find that fixing bugs is expensive if they are not caught early. Continuous Integration (CI) has proven to be a valuable technique in improving software quality and this session demonstrates CI for databases.
tSQLt is a testing framework that is designed to help you write repeatable, isolated tests against your database code. In this session we will briefly examine the goals of testing, and introduce tSQLt with a variety of demonstrations.
Everyone wants a dream job that they enjoy going to each week. Steve Jones will give you practical tips and suggestions in this session that show you how to better market yourself in today's competitive world.
Everyone tests their code, but most people use ad hoc, non-repeatable testing with simple queries. This session will show you how to begin implementing testing into your development process, giving you a growing library that improves code quality.
Come to this session to see how you can create a more efficient database development platform by integrating your VCS with SQL Server. In real-time, you’ll see how versioning, branching, merging, and the other manual tasks you hate can fade away with

Blog posts RSS

Am I a sysadmin?–#SQLNewBlogger 28 Apr 2016
  I was doing some security testing and wondered if I was a sysadmin. There are a few ways to check this, but I thought there should be a function to tell me. There’s this code, of course: SELECT    ServerRole = rp.name,    PrincipalName = SP.nameFROM ...

Losing All Traces of Data 28 Apr 2016
I was reading a thriller recently, in which a businessperson had their child threatened if they didn’t get some data for the criminals. Once the person had retrieved the data, they were told to delete it from the system and from all backups. Of course, they could do this, all in a few ...

Cloud First 27 Apr 2016
SQL Server 2016 is the first “cloud first” release of SQL Server, as told to us by Remus Rusanu, former Microsoft SQL Server development team member. The features and enhancements in SQL Server 2016 have been running in the Azure SQL Database cloud for some time before they will be ...

Specialist or Generalist 26 Apr 2016
What would you rather be: a expert specialist in some narrow area of SQL Server or a generalist that’s competent in many areas? The same question could apply to any area of technology, like C# or Windows, or even any subject in which you work. What’s your preference? Most of us ...

Explicitly using tempdb with ##tables 25 Apr 2016
I had someone ask me last night if this statement would create a permanent table in tempdb with a strange name or a global temp table: CREATE TABLE tempdb..##mytable ( id int ); My suspicion was that this would always be a temp table, but since I usually don’t include tempdb, I decided to ...