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Andre Kamman

I’m a SQL Server consultant based in the Netherlands. I’m a SQL Server MVP and I’m the co-founder and current chairman of the Dutch PASS Chapter and a member of the volunteer team for the Dutch SQL Saturday’s. I’ve done a whole lot of pure DBA work managing 100′s of servers and learning something new every day.

These days I spend a lot of time on just a few servers containing some large databases and the better part of the day is spent with SSIS. In both roles I’ve been using Powershell a lot. I joke sometimes that I replaced myself with a powershell script when leaving the DBA role, but these days I automate so much that I have to watch myself and not actually do just that

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I've been in more than one situation where I was asked to tune a system where they had thrown a years salary in hardware at the problem already. Only to find out that the app would run just 3% faster or even 10% slower ! I'll bring some examples and will show you what I did and why. This is not just for DBA's, DEV's should also get at least one usefull thing out of this session.
Henk van der Valk from the Unisys performance lab will be my special guest for this session. He has a test system that we all would like to have at home. The ES7000 has 96 Cores and half a Terabyte of RAM yes RAM (!). We will look at various ways to push SQL Server workloads by methodically detecting and resolving bottlenecks.Together we will show you how you can apply this approach on mid-sized and even smaller systems. (We’ll even try some of them on a laptop, and of course we will remote connect into the big machine ) In this session you will: Learn how to measure what the next bottle-neck is,using perfmon and waitstats. Hear about optimization tips that will get the most out of your hardware to speed up your processsing.
The new compression features built into the Enterprise Edition of SQL Server 2008 should use less disk space and, perhaps even more important, speed up your system because of reduced disk IO. In this session we will : Take a look behind the scenes to see how it works. Investigate what commands / tools we can use to set it up and maintain it. Look into some examples of my own day to day experience that I collected so far. I aim to give an overview of both data compression and backup compression AND some Lessons Learned.
I had to import and process 100+ files for my latest project and wondered if there was a way to generate SSIS packages based on a repository table containing the rules. As it turns out, this can be done but the programming model is a bit awkward. The samples that you can find online are not allways functional and debugging is difficult. I did get it to work though and will show you how I did it and what problems I ran into. After this session you will know how to generate packages that contain sources, destinations, cached lookups, derived columns, conditional splits, sorts, union all, etc. This session is not about the script component inside SSIS but about generating SSIS packages and programmatically reading and changing properties of existing packages.This session should also be usefull if you're not a full blown developer but more of a DBA type. I'm a DBA and I got through this :-)
PowerPivot can be a great troubleshooting / performance tuning tool for a dba besides just loading all the data in a database and start querying. I'll show the pro's and cons of PowerPivot while trying work with waitstats, profiler data etc.
I'll explain how to manage a large environment of 400+ instances in such a way that it's also useful if you have only 5 instances. Expect 50% processes and war stories and 50% demos and scripts (lots of PowerShell of course, but not everything)
SSIS in SQL Server 2012 has a lot of new features to help control larger projects. I'm doing a trial migration of our datawarehouse (100+ packages, 1TB+ db size) This session will be a will be a walkthrough of this process and a lessons learned
I know what you're thinking, Powershell is not an ETL tool. And you're probably right. But I keep running into weird requests that were just easier to fix with Powershell. I'll show you why some things are not easy in SSIS.
It's time to take your ad-hoc Powershell scripts turn them into your very own module. And while we're at it we will add proper error handling, parameterization & pipeline support. I will also demonstrate how to build help, force and whatif support.
In this session I will show you how to use Storage Spaces and Auto Tiering and some other features to build a highly available, fast, scale out file server. And then we'll use it to host SQL Server data & log files on it.

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